D.S. al Coda Label Launch and Release of A Ballad of Accounting

Dia Chelsea
Thu, 03/04/2010 (All day)

D.S. al Coda inaugurates its activities with the release of A Ballad of Accounting by Alex Waterman with a film by Liz Wendelbo.

The label is a collaboration between Alex Waterman and Dexter Sinister's David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey.

The launch takes place at the Dia Chelsea building as part of the Independent Show, curated by Thea Westreich and others.

Chaya Czernowin Residency and Festival

Thu, 02/25/2010 - 8:00pm - Fri, 02/26/2010 - 8:00pm

Chaya Czernowin Portrait Festival
26th February 2010, 8.30 pm
Tenri Cultural Institute www.tenri.org
43A W 13th Street, between 5th and 6th Avenues
$20 ($10 student/senior)

Chaya Czernowin, composer
Ina (1988, NY premiere)
Dam sheon hachol (1992 rev. 2002, NY premiere)
Die Kreuzung (1995, U.S. premiere)
Seed I (2008, U.S. premiere)
Anea (2008, U.S. premiere)

Aaron Baird - bass

Olivia de Prato - violin

Michael Ibrahim - saxophone

Margaret Lancaster - flutes

Victor Lowrie - viola 

Jessica Meyer - viola

Esther Noh - violin 

William Schimmel - accordion

Alex Waterman - cello

Richard Carrick and David Shively - conductors.

Israeli composer Chaya Czernowin joins Either/Or for a three day residency to present her ideas and music, including her first-ever U.S. portrait concert.

New World Radio

www.newworldradio.org
Sat, 01/29/2011 - 9:30pm - Mon, 01/31/2011 - 8:00pm

From New World Radio's Listing:

The Listeners!!!
Alexander Waterman on "Ballad of Accounting"
Matthew Welch on Balinese Gamelan
Two of our most successful shows of fall 2010 were cellist and composer Alex Waterman talking about Robert Ashley and bagpiper and composer Matthew Welch's introduction to Balinese Gamelan. We continue with these two members of a burgeoning New York experimental scene with a continuation of their conversations. Alexander talks about his conceptual piece "Ballad of Accounting" for cello and the BQE and its relation to the Ewan McColl busking classic. Matthew ends his illlustrations of the multiple instrumentations, forms, and uses of Balinese Gamelan in relation to his epic Bhima Swarga project with Ikue Mori.

Cardinal Polatuo

From Exact Change Anniversary Night at Issue Project Room. Alex Waterman performs Cardinal Polatuo. September 26, 2009.

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Your browser cannot display it, javascript must be enabled.

Tim Parkinson: Quartet

Plus Minus performs Tim Parkinson's "Quartet".

Vicky Wright, Alex Waterman, Mark Knoop, Tim Parkinson

Performed at the ICA, London on 31 May 2009

John White: Cello and Tuba Machine

Fragments from a two-hour performance at Listen/Space, Brooklyn. Performers Alex Waterman and Jay Rozen.

Laurence Crane: Come back to the old specimen cabinet John Vigani

Plus Minus performs Laurence Crane's "Come back to the old specimen cabinet John Vigani".

Alex Waterman - cello
Vicky Wright, Tom Pauwels, Matthew Shlomowitz, Laurence Crane, Joanna Bailie
Mark Knoop - auxilliary instruments

Angharad Davies and Alex Waterman

Angharad Davies (violin) and Alex Waterman (cello) improvise at Kämmer Klang, 26 May 2009.

Part 1:

Part 2:

A Necessary Music

A collaboration between artist Beatrice Gibson and composer Alex Waterman, A Necessary Music is a science fiction film about modernist social housing. A musically conceived piece, referencing the video operas of Robert Ashley, the film explores the social imaginary of a utopian landscape through directed attention to the voices that inhabit it. Treating the medium of film as both a musical proposition and a proposal for collective production, A Necessary Music employs the resident of New York’s Roosevelt Island as its authors and actors, gathering together texts written by them and using them to construct a script for the film. Framed by a fictional narration taken from Adolfo Bioy Casares’ 1941 science fiction novel ‘The invention of Morel’, the film self-consciously dissolves from attempted realism to imagined narrative; what begins as a enthnographic study becomes instead an imagined fiction and an investigation into the mechanics of representation itself.

You are missing some Flash content that should appear here! Your browser cannot display it, javascript must be enabled.